Remix Your Life’s Anime Picks to Binge Watch This Winter Break

Remix Your Life’s Anime Picks to Binge Watch This Winter Break

12.03.19
12.03.19

Picking the right anime to watch is a challenge! With legacy shows like “Dragon Ball Z” or “Naruto,” it’s easy to just stick with the classics. To alleviate the pain of finding new and exciting anime, our staff here at Remix Your Life has selected some of their favorite animes for you to watch. This list is perfect for those on winter break or who just have some time to kill. Pop some popcorn and sit back, relax, and get ready to binge-watch our top anime recommendations.

Fire Force

By Noah Edel

One might be bored by the sight of firefighters extinguishing fires on an anime. Who would think a firefighter going into the woods to exhaust a flame would be entertaining? However, there’s more to “Fire Force,” than meets the eye. “Fire Force” is set in a post-flame-engulfed Japan. An anomaly exists where citizens spontaneously combust, with some also able to manipulate and control fire. Special Fire Force Company 8 is a special fire brigade that is equipped to fight these “Infernos,” or giant fire demons. Special Force Company 8 is a unique set of firefighters — they each have superpowers. My first encounter with “Fire Force” was when I randomly saw a video on Instagram of a firefighter kicking fire out of his feet. That’s just one of the powers they have, these firefighters can set the world aflame or produce fire with their hands. Fire Force won’t bore you. As you progress through the series, the story deepens and you’ll see how intertwined Special Force Company 8 is with the church and the state. 

Cowboy Bebop

by Christian Romo

If you’re looking for a mini-series look no further than “Cowboy Bebop.” With only 22 Episodes how could you go wrong? It’s a short piece of cinematic glory that’s built a cult following over the years. I learned about “Cowboy Bebop” after reading about it on the internet randomly. I felt left out from a joke because there were a ton of memes and the theme song would come up constantly. I’d wonder “where did this come from?” so I decided to look it up, and instantly got hooked. I liked the space bounty-hunter theme and its dark humor. “Cowboy Bebop” is set in space and follows the story of two bounty hunters, Spike and Jet. They’re improper, scrappy and always looking for a new gig. Whether it be blowing up random spaceships or repaying debt, trouble seems to always follow the two. That’s the grim humor that pervades “Cowboy Bebop.” The show also makes fun of the mundane parts of life which makes it super relatable. I remember they were so poor at one point that they had to settle for eating just peppers for dinner. “Cowboy Bebop” rides on thrills and grim humor. Spike and Jet never fail to make the show exciting or relatable for any audience.

Seven Deadly Sins

by Michael Letang

“Seven Deadly Sins” is set in medieval Europe where a group of villains with superpowers wreak havoc on the town. The villains were framed for killing a great holy knight and ever since they’ve been known as the “Seven Deadly Sins.” They’re known for going into taverns and making a mess. The story follows Meliodas, the Dragon’s Sin of Wrath, and comedic Merlin, a pig representing the Sin of Gluttony. Meliodas and Merlin go on adventures to find the Demon Clan’s The Ten Commandments. Although “Seven Deadly Sins” has a dark backstory, the anime is pretty light-hearted. I always laugh, and I know you’ll always laugh with “Seven Deadly Sins.” The anime utilizes shock value funnily and inappropriately to make the audience comfortable. I was sometimes just shocked, but the humor lightens things up and makes the story accessible to all audiences. 

Seis Manos

by Stoney Creation

It’s rare to see any people of color in anime, and if you see people of color, they often aren’t properly represented. “Seis Manos” helps break that barrier. The anime takes place in Mexico and follows three orphans raised by a sensei who taught them how to defend themselves.  One day some community members are murdered and the three orphans investigate to get to the bottom of the murders. To have people of color in pivotal positions such as fighting evil is empowering to me, and audiences worldwide, because they’ve been historically portrayed by stereotypes that bring down their worth. The series clarifies the wrong depiction of people of color and properly represents them. The creators of the show are Latin, and you see how they express pride for their culture by implementing cultural aspects like language into the production. You can even hear it in the accents of the characters. “Seis Manos” should be on your watchlist. The show has a different approach to Anime that you must experience. 

Fate/Zero

by Primo Lagaso Goldberg

“Fate/Zero” focuses on one master, Kiritsugu Emiya, and his journey leading up to the fourth Holy Grail War. Every 60 years there’s a war dubbed the Holy Grail War between seven powerful wizards called Masters over an all-powerful, wish-granting device. Each Master must summon a servant, a physical reincarnation of legendary heroes from the past that must fight along with their master and win. If you win, you can grant any wish of your desire. The story follows the Masters’ preparation for the war, in which there are intricate interlocking plotlines embedded within “Fate/Zero” to tell a grander story. The anime makes striking commentary on society’s convention, teaching the audience lessons as they prepare to witness combat between the Masters. The journey to war takes inspiration from the Cold War, as the Masters prepare with strategic planning, spy on each other, plan clever tricks and scheme secret partnerships. What takes “Fate/Zero” up a notch is the beautiful animation style, it’s almost like a moving painting. Each episode is carefully drawn with clean lines and detailed backgrounds. Even fire is animated meticulously — you can see the transparent flames bleed into the background rather than opaque lines disrupting the scene. If you haven’t heard of “Fate/Zero,” definitely go watch an episode or two and get ready to be hooked. 

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